Posts tagged " young leaders "

SEPA Sustainable Growth Agreement – One Year On

January 29th, 2019 Posted by News No Comment yet

CONTINUING OUR PARTNERSHIP WITH SEPA

In July 2017, 2050 Climate Group became the third organisation to establish a Sustainable Growth Agreement (SGA) with the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA). This voluntary formal agreement has enabled both organiations to build a stronger partnership, share and deliver environmental outcomes set out in SEPA’s One Planet Prosperity – Regulatory Strategy and create opportunities for engaging young people from all backgrounds and locations in climate change leadership.

SEPA and 2050 Climate Group will continue to work together over the next year towards the objectives of the Sustainable Growth Agreement. A summary of some keys areas of focus are outlined below:

  • Developing opportunities and models for youth engagement, influence and decision making in policy and strategy through the SEPA sector plans.
  • Supporting international leadership in climate change and One Planet Prosperity through the International Innovation Panel and shared learning from new projects in Malawi.
  • Increasing representation and participation from young people in governance; working together to encourage regulated businesses and partners to consider young people for board-level positions.
  • 11 members of SEPA staff to participate in the Third Young Leaders Development Programme.
  • Utilising SEPA’s corporate communications expertise to help support and build the profile of the work of the 2050 Climate Group.

On this partnership, SEPA Chief Executive, Terry A’Hearn said: “Scotland has set some of the most ambitious climate change targets in the world.  As we pursue these targets, we are lucky enough to have a group of young Scots who are trying to help tackle climate change.  They aren’t waiting for powerful institutions to take action.  They aren’t moaning about the dilemma their parents’ generation has left them.  They are getting on with it and creating innovation and action here in Scotland.  I am determined that, through this Sustainable Growth Agreement, SEPA will support these young Scots to do what they do best – make things happen.

Read the full SGA Review here

Malawian Youth Climate Leaders meet Scottish Government Ministers

January 25th, 2019 Posted by News No Comment yet

MaSP and 2050 Climate Group shared experiences of the Malawian Youth Climate Leaders project with Scottish Government Ministers this week.

Promise Matatiyo and Joanna Ziwa met with  Ben Macpherson, the Minister for Europe, Migration and International Development and Roseanna Cunningham, Cabinet Secretary for Environment, Climate Change and Land Reform.

Here, they had the opportunity to share their stories about innovative energy solutions, sustainable development education and climate change advocacy in the country.  It was also a chance for the Minister and Cabinet Secretary to hear firsthand about the impact this project has already had on the lives of young leaders in Malawi.

Climate change impacts in Malawi includes extreme weather events that induce devastating flooding and droughts, which negatively affect food and water security, energy security, livelihoods and conservation efforts.

Vera Kamtukule, Chief Executive of the Malawi Scotland Partnership (MaSP) said: “Malawi is a country, which is at the sharp end of the effects of climate change where its impacts are a reality now.

“Nearly half of Malawi’s population is aged 18 or under and so it’s right that young people are key agents of change in this most pressing issue.

Malawian Youth Climate Leaders Promise and Joanna meeting with Cabinet Secretary, Roseanna Cunningham, MSP and Ben Macpherson, MSP

“The interconnectivity of the effects of climate change with our economy cannot be over emphasised. I know from Minister Ben Macpherson’s visit to Malawi last summer, which we greatly appreciated, that listening to the voice of Youth is a priority for the Scottish Government as well.”

As part of the Scotland’s 2018 Year of Young People, First Minister Nicola Sturgeon announced funding for a new partnership project between MaSP and 2050 Climate Group in April last year at the Youth Climate Summit in Glasgow.

Together, these organisations with the support from the Scotland Malawi Partnership are collaborating on the Malawi’s Climate Leaders project, which aims to deliver climate change engagement training and create a network of ambitious young individuals that want to contribute to a sustainable future.

The purpose of this partnership is to empower young Malawians and increase their leadership roles in climate action. The role of 2050 Climate Group is to inspire and support youth leadership while facilitating a two-way intercultural exchange between volunteers of both organisations.

MaSP has built many successful connections with existing youth organisations on the ground such as the National Youth Council, creating a steering committee of young individuals aged below 35 to shape the project activities and recruited 26 Youth Leaders from all over Malawi who will participate in the project.

Cabinet Secretary for Environment, Climate Change and Rural Affairs, Roseanna Cunningham said: “I am pleased that the Scottish Government continues to support the efforts of the 2050 Malawi’s Climate Leaders project, which does fantastic work empowering young leaders to support the delivery of a just, low carbon future.

“The Minister for International Development and I were delighted to hear directly from two of the project’s young climate leaders. The work they are doing to raise awareness of the impacts of climate change and building a network of young people who are committed to finding socially-just solutions to tackling climate change in Malawi is truly inspirational.”

Elizabeth Dirth, Trustee of 2050 Climate Group, said: “Young people, as crucial stakeholders in tackling climate change and its coming impacts, should be given the knowledge, tools, and authority to create a future they want to be a part of.

“This holds true just as much in Malawi as it does in Scotland. This project between MaSP and 2050 Climate Group is a key example of an ambitious and innovative climate change project run by young people for young people.

“As Scotland’s youth-led charity empowering young people to take action on climate change, we think it is essential for the international community to recognise and nurture young people to be leaders on climate action and climate justice.”

For more information, visit the 2050 Climate Group website.

COP 23: Reflections

November 16th, 2017 Posted by Blogs, COP No Comment yet

2050 Climate Group team member,  Siri Pantzar, offers some reflections on time spent at COP 23 in Bonn, Germany this November. 

 

It is such a precious thing, this conference. People who are all passionate about climate change, discussing solutions, research, projects, and policies. Everyone is keen. Everyone is interested. Everyone is buzzing.

It’s a shame that that’s all pretty much restricted to this event though.

When we go home, we go back to the silence on climate change. Most people don’t talk about climate change in their everyday lives. People around us are concerned, but don’t voice it, don’t engage with it, and more often than not don’t see it as an immediate issue that they have to do something about in their own lives, or one that impacts them. It’s in the future, it’s those poor polar bears, it’s in the small island states and in Africa. While this motivates some people to buy clean energy, turn down the heating or vote for greener candidates, most people are more concerned about immediate issues (or ones they perceive as such): getting a job, paying their bills, getting food for your children, getting a mortgage. Climate change is indeed big and bad, but essentially something somewhere else, for somebody else with more time on their hands to do.

One of the things I’ve constantly been impressed with about 2050 Climate Group is how it really addresses this issue, through making climate change relevant for young professionals by bringing it to the sphere where we have to operate in. We might want to do something about climate change, but often focus instead on things that will pay our bills, add experience to our CVs, or build us networks. 2050 fits into that framework. It makes being a part of the global action against climate change useful and fun to us, in our own specific terms, together with other people like us.

Yesterday I attended a talk by George Marshall, and I realised how special and crucial that is. George Marshall is a climate change communicator and the founder of Climate Outreach, a non-profit research organisation supporting those that want to work on climate communications. He stresses that tailoring the message is crucial; too often we use the same polar bear and disaster images, too often the messages are tailored to us who are already keen and identify with the issue, not to those that are not. Especially as we see the global politics reaching points where major countries can elect leaders that don’t believe in climate change, we, as people who know that this should not be a partisan issue, should acknowledge that we have allowed it to become one. There are values that we all hold dear involved in promoting climate change action, but they are not the same values for those on the left, as for those on the centre right, or those in faith communities, or environmental activists, or coal worker communities, or British people or Finnish people or Chinese people. For some it’s a question of justice and planetary environment, and those messages get aired often; for others it’s about fairness, or working together, or bringing the world to balance, preserving our heritage, protecting the world that is a gift from God, or keeping champagne production possible in Champagne. Authenticity is key; we want to see people who are like us, and care about the same things as we do, tell us that we can work together to protect those things. That’s why we can’t leave talking about climate change to environmental activists; their messages are relevant for people like them, but then again, people like them are in most cases already engaged.

Most importantly, these conversations need to happen and continue to happen, outside this bubble. Often they aren’t easy; at least I often inherently assume that no-one else is interested and that I come across as nagging, which is unlikely to be true. We need to create space, and have conversations, and make spaces for conversations that are appealing and create communities. The 2050 Climate Group has provided that for many of us; now we need to continue to spread it out to everyone else.