Posts tagged " reporting "

COP 23: Reflections

November 16th, 2017 Posted by Blogs, COP No Comment yet

2050 Climate Group team member,  Siri Pantzar, offers some reflections on time spent at COP 23 in Bonn, Germany this November. 

 

It is such a precious thing, this conference. People who are all passionate about climate change, discussing solutions, research, projects, and policies. Everyone is keen. Everyone is interested. Everyone is buzzing.

It’s a shame that that’s all pretty much restricted to this event though.

When we go home, we go back to the silence on climate change. Most people don’t talk about climate change in their everyday lives. People around us are concerned, but don’t voice it, don’t engage with it, and more often than not don’t see it as an immediate issue that they have to do something about in their own lives, or one that impacts them. It’s in the future, it’s those poor polar bears, it’s in the small island states and in Africa. While this motivates some people to buy clean energy, turn down the heating or vote for greener candidates, most people are more concerned about immediate issues (or ones they perceive as such): getting a job, paying their bills, getting food for your children, getting a mortgage. Climate change is indeed big and bad, but essentially something somewhere else, for somebody else with more time on their hands to do.

One of the things I’ve constantly been impressed with about 2050 Climate Group is how it really addresses this issue, through making climate change relevant for young professionals by bringing it to the sphere where we have to operate in. We might want to do something about climate change, but often focus instead on things that will pay our bills, add experience to our CVs, or build us networks. 2050 fits into that framework. It makes being a part of the global action against climate change useful and fun to us, in our own specific terms, together with other people like us.

Yesterday I attended a talk by George Marshall, and I realised how special and crucial that is. George Marshall is a climate change communicator and the founder of Climate Outreach, a non-profit research organisation supporting those that want to work on climate communications. He stresses that tailoring the message is crucial; too often we use the same polar bear and disaster images, too often the messages are tailored to us who are already keen and identify with the issue, not to those that are not. Especially as we see the global politics reaching points where major countries can elect leaders that don’t believe in climate change, we, as people who know that this should not be a partisan issue, should acknowledge that we have allowed it to become one. There are values that we all hold dear involved in promoting climate change action, but they are not the same values for those on the left, as for those on the centre right, or those in faith communities, or environmental activists, or coal worker communities, or British people or Finnish people or Chinese people. For some it’s a question of justice and planetary environment, and those messages get aired often; for others it’s about fairness, or working together, or bringing the world to balance, preserving our heritage, protecting the world that is a gift from God, or keeping champagne production possible in Champagne. Authenticity is key; we want to see people who are like us, and care about the same things as we do, tell us that we can work together to protect those things. That’s why we can’t leave talking about climate change to environmental activists; their messages are relevant for people like them, but then again, people like them are in most cases already engaged.

Most importantly, these conversations need to happen and continue to happen, outside this bubble. Often they aren’t easy; at least I often inherently assume that no-one else is interested and that I come across as nagging, which is unlikely to be true. We need to create space, and have conversations, and make spaces for conversations that are appealing and create communities. The 2050 Climate Group has provided that for many of us; now we need to continue to spread it out to everyone else.

Reporting from ECCA 2017, Closing Plenary

June 14th, 2017 Posted by Blogs No Comment yet

To close out an excellent conference, we were asked to participate in the closing plenary of ECCA. Having had 10 2050 Climate Group members participating in the conference, I was asked to close out the conference with some reflections from young people.

Throughout the conference, 2050 Climate Group attendees reported back on the outcomes and learnings from each of the sessions they attended. Some of this can be found in the form of blogs published on our website.

When it came time to participate in the plenary, it was clear that the topic of young people, their voice, participation and value had been a key topic discussed throughout sessions. This is largely due to the foresight of the local steering group in inviting the 2050 Climate Group to participate, and the excellent work of Sam Curran and Shona Rawlings, who represented the organisation in this forum. Through this partnership, a programme emerged which highlighted young people in each plenary session, and also featured a range of young researchers and school children. This is the first conference that I have attended where I felt that young people sufficiently input into the design and development, as well as attendance and sessions as they ran through. To include young people in each plenary, was a significant decision of the Glasgow ECCA organising committee, one which we think shows a positive step towards further inclusion and value of the perspectives of young people in an integrated and inclusive way.

In the plenary, I was asked to participate in a discussion which focussed around the following three questions.

Question 1. Where are we in Europe with Climate Change Adaptation?

In response to this question, I highlighted the way that we can see a change in how we look at the change in language that we use….

“We are and we continue to be quite detached… both in time and space from the reality of the largest biggest impacts and from the scale of the task at hand. I think this detachment makes us less urgent – this is true for both for mitigation and adaptation. This can be seen in the way we use language now. For example take the word capacity. The way we use this has changed and it seems to have lost all meaning… When we talk about capacity, as almost every presentation did, we refer to building capacity or our adaptive capacity. Somehow this is different from what capacity should be, which is human resources, brain space and funding and financial resources.

Another key word is vulnerability. We have really changed the meaning of this when we talk about adaptation. We have started to use the word vulnerability to be almost synonymous with risk, but this is not the case. Vulnerability is inherently human, it is emotive, and psychological, and we’ve lost touch with what it actually means to be vulnerable to climate change because it is a different thing than measuring risk.”

Question 2. What are new insights from ECCA for science, policy, business and practice?

I started this discussion by agreeing with the points that the other two before me had made, which is that the greater inclusion of stakeholders in this conference is significant. Noting that there was the feeling at this conference that a diversity of stakeholders actually mattered, and this was a significant change from previous conferences.

Elizabeth Dirth at the Closing Plenary. Seated with our panelists.

Following this, I also reflected on a new trend that I noticed that could be capitalised on, and this is the narrative. It is apparent, especially in Scotland, that the narrative around climate change adaptation is changing. A focus on co-benefits, a focus on inclusivity of stakeholders and participation, and a focus on innovation and excitement about the future. The future is sexy … everybody loves to talk about it: future tech, future visions, future generations, futuristic media & culture. Adaptation is pretty fundamentally about the future. There’s more work to do on narratives that hook people, but we’ve come a long way in a short time on this… and I’m quite proud of the work that’s been done in Scotland on this.

Question 3. New challenges, new questions, new directions emerging from ECCA 2017

For me, the next challenge is how do we deal with the inherent injustice in climate change adaptation…

I don’t like to admit this in private, let alone to a large audience, but by the time I’m in my mid 40’s, according to current projections, we’ll be living in a 2 degree warmer world. That means, if I’m lucky enough to live that long, I’ll spend half my life in a world with the consequences of 2 degrees of temperature rise.

Let that sink in… I find this utterly terrifying. And I don’t even live in a small island state, or rely on agriculture for my well-being. I’m not particularly vulnerable like so many of those around the globe, I just happened to be alive at a certain time.

Personally, I believe that as long as we continue to talk about climate change in terms of ppm, degrees of temperature, CO2, cm of sea level rise… using our current models and metrics … instead of talking about it in terms of human lives lost or ruined, we will not progress with the scale and urgency we need to. We also need to learn to value this measurement, the measurement of the human life… and by this I mean the human life everywhere. Climate change is global. The value of my life does not matter any more than that of someone in a Pacific Island state, or South Sudan.

Many of us working in this field are scientists… we’re trained to deal with this a certain way… but at the end of the day, the front line of climate change adaptation is someone terrified about what their future holds. We need to look that person in the face…

I think we all have a responsibility to make that future positive, both by injecting ourselves, our institutions, etc. with a bit more urgency, and also by painting positive pictures of what the future can be. Everybody these days says love trumps fear… will I think hope trumps fear…. Hope of a better future rather than a catastrophic one, and everyone in this room has a responsibility for developing that positive vision and for collective action.


Written by: Elizabeth Dirth, Trustee & former Chair

ecca reporting

Reporting from ECCA 2017, Day 1

June 6th, 2017 Posted by Blogs No Comment yet

In the opening plenary of the 3rd European Climate Change Adaptation (ECCA) Conference, it was stressed that young people must be at the heart of climate change. When it comes to the most pressing environmental issue, we are the key stakeholder and part of our role at 2050 is communicating this to other young people. During this conference, members of our Operational Teams and Board will be attending sessions of interest and will use the 2050 blog as a space to report back on what they’ve learned and how young people can get involved.  


On Tuesday 6 June, Policy Subgroup member, Bente Klein reports back…

Opening Plenary

This third year of the ECCA is unique because businesses are now involved and there is a full business day (Tuesday), as well as an innovation day (prize money up to £20,000 I believe) tomorrow. It was pointed out multiple times that there is a need to build alliances with businesses, hence the importance of their presence. Further, the importance of young people was stressed by the rep of the European Commission and Roseanna Cunningham MSP who even mentioned 2050. The youth voice during the opening plenary came from Joel Meekison from the Scottish Youth Parliament. He reported that in a recent survey by Scottish Youth Parliament,  only 10% of the young people surveyed regard climate change as the number 1 environmental concern we should be working on. Others found e.g. litter much more important. It was mentioned that young people need to be able to participate in a systematic way and not just on an ad hoc basis or to tick the boxes. Further, because young people are such a diverse group, with consequently a diverse view on climate change, this should be catered for. How can we (young people & the 2050 Climate Group) ensure that businesses, politicians, key influencers work with us to ‘make the planet great again’? (a key message that was repeated multiple times in the plenary).


4.1 Adaptation Governance

This session looked at the way in which different levels of government interact with each other when it comes to adaptation strategies and policies. As climate change is clearly a multi-level governance challenge, there was an expectation that the adaptation to it would also be a part of adaptation strategy (Reinhard Steuer). However, it turns out that in the research conducted by Steuer et al. there was hardly any institutionalised interaction, if at all the interaction was only project based and purely ad hoc. The same applies for the active engagement from the private sector, policy documents do mention its importance but there is a lack on how (Johannes Klein). Case study of Pittsburgh, PA, presented by Kimberley Lucke showed that there was a big focus on the individual and the role they could play. This creates a ‘Climate Conscious Citizen’ but has led to the shifting away from actors that have much more leverage than individuals. It was concluded that because individualism does not produce effective action, serious action is required from those with more leverage. Potentially this applies only to the US and would need further research to see if it could be applicable elsewhere (the researcher seemed to hint that it wouldn’t be applicable elsewhere).

In short, more coordinated multilevel action is needed and there are many opportunities for young people to ensure that the policies among governance levels are streamlined. This will be a massive task, but the example of mitigation (e.g. effort sharing in the EU) will be there to help guide the adaptation policymakers.


6.9 Fostering dialogue and learning on M&E of climate change adaptation (CCA) and disaster risk reduction (DRR) policies.

Countries develop M&E (monitoring & evaluation) schemes especially for their reporting requirements under EU and international law, but also to a lesser extent for the national-level legal and admin requirements in place in their country. This applies both to CCA and to DRR. Both fields struggle with the same issues (‘pitfalls’) in their reporting. The main pitfall being that there is no single indicator that is universal, despite many attempts from researchers. If one tries to universalise issues, then there is a great risk that the deeper understanding of the specific context will get lost. Further, despite the desire to work with quantitative data only, one should never forget that there is a specific context and narrative behind these data and it is crucial to understand these as well. Finally, the adaptation progress is often greater than the simple sum of individual interventions. Therefore, the sketching of an overall picture is very difficult. The potential for M&E, on the other hand, in both fields is great. It can mainly be used as a learning tool as well as for accountability reporting.

 

Tomorrow we’ll have more updates!

 

Please note, we are keen to try and report daily and as such, these reports may be brief. It’s possible that we might elaborate on some of the learned topics in future blogs. 


About ECCA 2017 (taken from website)

“The theme of ECCA 2017 is ‘Our Climate Ready Future’. Our vision is that this conference will inspire and enable people to work together to discover and deliver positive climate adaptation solutions that can strengthen society, revitalise local economies and enhance the environment. We are bringing together the people who will deliver action on the ground – from business, industry, NGOs, local government and communities – to share knowledge, ideas and experience with leading researchers and policymakers.”

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